Informing the Public


Those who say they voted for President Donald Trump in the general election relied heavily on Fox News as their main source of election information, whereas Hillary Clinton voters named an array of different sources, with no single one named by more than 1 in 5 of her supporters.
Informing the public

Chicago police secure the area around a residence believed to be the home of a suspected murderer. (© Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Survey explores police officers’ views of their profession

In January, the Pew Research Center published a report that examined the attitudes and experiences of U.S. police officers, finding that 86 percent of police officers say their work is harder today as a result of recent high-profile fatal encounters between black citizens and police. Major newspapers and at least 450 websites cited the report. Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) cited data from the report during the Senate Judiciary Committee’s confirmation hearing for attorney general.

Report analyzes congressional rhetoric

In February, the Pew Research Center published the first report from its Data Labs team, which uses computational tools and methods to complement and expand the center’s research agenda. The report, which analyzed the rhetoric of more than 200,000 press releases and Facebook posts by members of the 114th Congress, found that the most aggressive forms of disagreement were relatively rare. Academics, data scientists, and other key stakeholders widely praised the research. 

Study finds differing media habits of 2016 voters

Building on previous work about media polarization, the Pew Research Center released a report in January about the public’s main sources of news during the 2016 presidential campaign. The report found that those who say they voted for President Donald Trump in the general election relied heavily on Fox News as their main source of election information, whereas Hillary Clinton voters named an array of different sources, with no single one named by more than 1 in 5 of her supporters. Additionally, some sources, including NBC, CBS, and Facebook, were about equally likely to be named by voters on both sides. Similar percentages of Trump (7 percent) and Clinton (8 percent) voters said Facebook was their main source of news about the campaign.

Informing the public

(© Jean Claude Moschetti/REA/Redux)

Report focuses on childhood inoculations and trust in vaccine science

The Pew Research Center published a report in February examining Americans’ views of childhood vaccines and their trust in biomedical scientists. An overwhelming majority of Americans (82 percent) support requiring all healthy schoolchildren to be vaccinated for measles, mumps, and rubella. Seventy-three percent of U.S. adults believe that scientists should have a major role in policy decisions related to childhood vaccines, and 55 percent say they trust information from biomedical scientists to give a full and accurate picture of the health effects of vaccines.